Saturday’s Post Breakfast Ride – 600+ KM and Glorious Weather

Mid-October, and we bask in unseasonably warm Fall weather

Mid-October, and we bask in unseasonably warm Fall weather

Door-to-door, Saturday's breakfast ride from Edmonton to within spitting distance of the Saskatchewan border and back

Door-to-door, Saturday’s breakfast ride from Edmonton to within spitting distance of the Saskatchewan border and back

‘When the sun’s shining, make hay”, goes the old saying.  And make hay we did.

Northern Alberta has been luxuriating in an unseasonably warm October.  In past years, most motorcyclists have put their bikes into storage by October.  This year, we’re enjoying the proverbial Indian Summer.  The day time high reached a summer-like 20.4-degrees C, which is some 11 degrees warmer than average.

We took advantage of the superb sunny, warm weather to put some miles on yesterday.

After our weekly Saturday morning breakfast, a handful of riders suited up and undertook a little after-meal ride.  Rod R. (BMW R1200CL) and Robyn S. (BMW R1200RT) took turns leading our group, with Dennis D. (BMW R1150GSA), Richard G. (Moto Guzzi Stelvio 1200 NTX), Bjorn J. (Honda XLV1000 Varadero) and me (BMW R1200RT) in tow.

Our group leaders took us to unfamiliar territory, southeast to Provost, a small town within spitting distance of the Saskatchewan border.  With only a couple of stops for fuel (our party did not start off ‘synced’, and without the same level of gasoline, we were ‘out of phase’, with some needing to refill before others) and a short coffee break, we managed a hearty day ride of some 600 plus kilometres.

I was surprised.  That part of Eastern Alberta is rolling farmland, not bald, flat prairie.  While not English countryside pretty, it certainly was picturesque

We departed breakfast at about 10:30 AM and I rolled into my driveway at 6:00 PM.  It was a long-ish day.

New Learnings

I’m still learning about the idiosyncrasies of the new 2014 BMW R1200RT.  For the first time, I’ve run the fuel until the Reserve light has come on, at an impressive 437 km.  Upon refueling, the RT took 19.95 L, leaving a ‘Reserve’ of a tad more than 5.0 L.  That works out to a fuel consumption rate of 4.6 L/100 km, (61.4 Imp. mpg) yielding a theoretical maximum range of 543 kilometres when the 25-litre tank would be bone dry. The R1200RT has more range than the majority of riders have the butt endurance to stay in the saddle for the RT’s approximately 4-hour plus fuel range.  Nice to know.

0 Comments

You can be the first one to leave a comment.

Leave a Comment