2014 BMW R1200RT Dyno Results

What is power?

“. . .power grows out of the barrel of a gun” is a fine quotation from Chinese revolutionary Mao Zedong, but that refers to political power.  We gearheads are more interested in engine power, and the easiest way to measure that is by testing an engine or vehicle on a dynometer.

The new 2014 BMW R1200RT liquid-cooled boxer engine was first introduced in the 2013 R1200GS adventure-tourer, and typically, we expect every new engine to be more powerful than the version it’s replacing.

BMW claims the 4-valve DOHC fuel-injected liquid-cooled twin pumps out a solid 125 horsepower @ 7,750 rpm and 125 Nm (92 ft-lbs) of torque @ 6,500 rpm.  But that’s measured at the crankshaft.

What does the 2014 BMW 1,170 cc twin engine put out at the rear wheel?

Here’s a rundown of published dynometer tests  for rear wheel horsepower we’ve found for the 2014 BMW R1200RT.  We’ve tossed in some interesting comparisons to show how the new liquid-cooled boxer engine stacks up against the formidable offerings of other manufacturers.

(A cautionary note about these horsepower and torque numbers.  One can’t make direct comparisons of dyno horsepower and torque numbers.  Different brands and types of dynos will measure power in slightly different ways.  Even comparing power numbers measured on the same dyno can be tricky if the measurements were done on different days and the operator has not used various ‘correction’ factors to account for differences in ambient temperature atmospheric pressure.)

Still, these numbers are fun to scrutinize, and they offer a broad-brush, very general way to compare the power characteristics of different engines.

  • Cycle World magazine video:  2014 BMW R1200RT, 113.5 hp @ 8,400 rpm; 82.1 lb-ft @ 6,340 rpm
  • Rider magazine:  2014 BMW R1200RT, 114.6 hp @ 7,900 rpm; 82.7 lb-ft @ 6,400 rpm

Note that the new 1,170 cc RT makes about the same power as the superlative 1,261 cc DOHC V4 engine found in the Honda ST1300.

Interesting comparisons:

(Cycle World magazine video)

  • 2015 Aprilia Capo Nord, 106.1 hp @ 8,150 rpm; 73.5 lb-ft @ 6,760 rpm

(Motorcycle USA, Sept. 2011)

  • 2012 Yamaha Super Tenere 1200, 90.75 hp @ 7,300 rpm; 71.19 lb-ft @ 5,500 rpm

(Motorcycle.com, July 2014)

  • BMW K1600GT, 123.4 hp @ 7,900 rpm; 107.7 lb-ft @ 5,000 rpm
  • Kawasaki Concours 14 ABS, 139.4 hp @ 9,100 rpm; 89.3 lb-ft @ 7,400 rpm
  • Triumph Trophy SE, 111.7 hp @ 9,000 rpm; 74.6 lb-ft @ 6,300 rpm
  • Yamaha FJR1300ES, 127.2 hp @ 8,100 rpm; 88.7 lb-ft @ 6,800 rpm

(Motorcyclist magazine, June 2009)

  • BMW R1200RT, 101.1 hp @ 7,500 rpm; 78.0 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm
  • Honda ST1300A, 114.1 hp @ 7,500 rpm; 83.5 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm
  • Kawasaki Concours 14, 133.0 hp @ 9,200 rpm; 87.0 lb-t @ 7,700 rpm
  • Yamaha FJR1300, 127.2 hp @ 7,900 rpm; 89.6 lb-ft @ 6,800 rpm

(Motorcycle.com, April 2013 )

  • Ducati Multistrada S Touring, 130.9 hp @ 9,300 rpm; 78.4 lb-ft @ 7,400 rpm
  • Triumph Tiger Explorer, 111.7 hp @ 9,000 rpm; 74.6 lb-ft @ 6,300 rpm

(Motorcycle.com, Aug. 2009)

  • 2009 BMW K1300GT, 145.3 hp @ 9,900 rpm, 87.8 lb-ft @ 8,300 rpm

 

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