Footpeg lowering kit – 2014/15 BMW R1200RTW

BEFORE Suburban Machinery lowering kit installation - left footpeg and gearshift in stock position, 2014 BMW R1200RTW

BEFORE Suburban Machinery lowering kit installation – left footpeg and gearshift in stock position, 2014 BMW R1200RTW

AFTER - Suburban Machinery lowering kit installed, left footpeg drops 1.45" and moves forward 0.38"

AFTER  Suburban Machinery lowering kit installed, left footpeg drops 1.45″ and moves forward 0.38″, 2014 BMW R1200RTW

The 2014 BMW R1200RTW is unquestionably a superb, long distance touring machine.  Arguably, it’s one of the best in the world.

Still, like many motorcyclists, there are little ‘tweaks’ we want to make to tailor the bike to perfectly fit our needs.

In my case, the 2012 Moto Guzzi Stelvio NTX and 2007 Honda GL1800A Gold Wing both had riding ergonomics that gave my 5′ 7″ frame more leg room and a more upright riding position than the 2014 R1200RTW.

Age is starting to catch up with me, and I’ve found that the BMW’s ‘tighter’ riding position, with its footpegs slightly higher and more rear-set than the Stelvio and Wing’s was starting to cause occasional pain in my right hip.

After riding Robyn’s 2010 R1200RT fitted with Suburban Machinery’s CNC-milled aluminum footpeg lowering mounts, I was sold.

I ordered the DL3N driver’s footpeg lowering kit (which fits 1996-2015 RTs) from Suburban Machinery in Ohio.  Price:  $US179.95 + $US48.85 shipping via FedEx, which includes brokerage fees for ‘handling’ with Canada Customs.)  I placed the order online on Monday morning, June 15th and the package was delivered Wednesday, June 17th, with the FedEx courier collecting an additional $C11.07 for GST.  Total cost delivered to my door including GST was $C290.90.

Installation

Phil is my local on-call motorcycle mechanic extraordinaire.  When Phil immigrated to Canada from Australia, he worked as a Norton mechanic, and today he graciously works on friends’ bikes.  To the mechanically inept like me, Phil’s mechanical expertise is a godsend.

In Phil’s garage, he rips open the sealed plastic bags containing the two machined mounts, scans the one page of instructions, and starts on the right (brake) side footpeg.  The only difficulty he has is remounting the footpeg’s OEM spring, which requires some strength to hold with needle nose pliers.

Next, he tackles the left (gearshift) side footpeg.  Again, the only difficulty he has is attaching the OEM spring.  He’s finished installing both footpeg mounts in 26 minutes.

BEFORE - right (gearshift) side, OEM footpeg location

BEFORE – right (brake pedal) side, OEM footpeg location

AFTER - Suburban Machinery footpeg lowering mount installed.  Note:  the 2014/15 BMW R1200RTW brake pedal is not adjustable for height

AFTER – Suburban Machinery footpeg lowering mount installed. Note: the 2014/15 BMW R1200RTW brake pedal is not adjustable for height

Phil spends another twenty minutes fiddling with the gearshift lever, which is height adjustable (but only a few millimetres.)

The entire job – installing both new footpeg mounts and adjusting the height of the gearshift lever took 46 minutes.

Results

With only a short twenty minute ride home under my belt, the change in riding position is remarkable.

With the footpegs lowered almost 1-1/2-in. and moved forward about 0.4-in., my leg position has ‘opened up’ significantly with my legs more ‘unbent.’

In fact, the increased legroom has made me rethink my need for handlebar risers, but we’ll wait on that decision.

Apparently on the 2014 and 2015 RTs, BMW eliminated the adjustability of the brake pedal.  Instead of resting the balls of one’s feet on the peg and simply sliding your right foot inward so your boot is placed over the brake pedal, I now have to lift my foot slightly and then apply the brake.  I’m sure one can get used to this (think of all the cruiser riders where you lift your foot off the floorboard and raise it waaaay up to reach the rear brake pedal.)  I’m thinking a talented machinist ought to be able to fabricate a new brake pedal with the correct height to compensate for the lowered right peg.

The gearshift lever is still perhaps a couple of millimetres too high but Phil believes there’s a bit more room for adjustment.  We’ll see.

It’s still early days, but I’m happy with the new lowered footpeg position.

Click here to link to Suburban Machinery’s website.

 

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