TurnCycle Centre Stand Disc – review

TurnCycle Centrestand disc shown with 2014 BMW R1200RT

TurnCycle Centrestand disc shown with 2014 BMW R1200RT

Motorcycle storage is an issue for me.  We’ve got a one-car, attached garage.  Of course, it’s filled with the ‘stuff’ one accumulates in life. Crammed with bicycles, lawnmower, snow blower, tool boxes and cardboard boxes filled with who knows what, I’ve got to squeeze the RT in.

Making matters worse, our 60-plus year old house has a driveway that’s sunken right at the entrance to the garage.  There’s a perfect ‘V’ in the pavement that makes it really awkward to back the RT out of the garage.

The solution of course is to find a device that enables me to ride into the garage and then turn it around once I’m inside.

The TurnCycle Centre Stand disc came to my attention after last year’s Edmonton Motorcycle Show.  My riding buddy, Kevin, said he’d seen the product and it looked like a handy, quality built accessory that I might find useful for my cramped storage quarters and dicey driveway.

The TurnCycle disc is designed to be placed under a motorcycle so the rider can lift the bike onto its centre stand onthe disc.  Once the bike’s centre stand is on the disc, the bike can be rotated on the turntable so the rider can ride straight out of the garage instead of backing the bike out.

Easy peasy.

The RT being rotated in tight quarters on the TurnCycle Centrestand disc

The RT being rotated in tight quarters on the TurnCycle Centre Stand disc

And the RT has been turned around and ready to ride straight out of the garage

And the RT has been turned around and ready to ride straight out of the garage

Using the TurnCycle Disc

Using the TurnCycle disc for the first few times took a bit of trial and error.

A large, yellow “+” marking helps you visually place the disc correctly in line  ahead of the rear wheel, but it took me a couple of attempts before I could position the disc so both feet of the centre stand landed symmetrically on the plate.  (In fact, on my first attempt, the centre stand’s feet were offset to one side.  When I lifted the bike, the lopsided pressure caused the plate to tilt to one side with the centre stand slipping.  That resulted in gouging the clear, rubbery, non-slip coating on the disc.)

This positioning is off centre and not correct. Getting the positioning right takes some experimentation. It becomes second nature after a couple of times.

This photo shows incorrect (uneven) centre stand placement. Getting the positioning right takes some experimentation, but becomes second nature after a couple of times.

After a couple of attempts, using the TurnCycle disc becomes second nature.  One note on usage:  the TurnCycle disc is “less than 1/2-in. thick”, according to the manufacturer.  With the RT, that means I have to use more strength and momentum to get the bike onto its centre stand due to the TurnCycle’s extra height.  It’s not a big deal.  You just have to use a slightly more, concerted effort.

Specifications

The disc is 15-3/4-in. in diameter and about 1/2-in. thick.  TurnCycle says the rotating disc can hold up to 1,000 lbs, so it should be good for a luxury tourer like a Gold Wing (about 900 lbs. curb weight fully fueled).

The TurnCycle retails for $164.95 Cdn (it’s made in Canada), plus shipping.  Discounts may be available at motorcycle shows or shortly thereafte.  (I got a 10-percent discount by ordering it shortly after last year’s Edmonton Motorcycle Show.)

TurnCycle also sells the disc with ‘leveling mats’, little ramps you place fore and aft the disc.  I didn’t buy the mats.

The company has recently announced a second, slightly larger version that is 20-in. in diameter.  When speaking to TurnCycle’s owner Rob Baetz in Ontario, he said he has an agreement with Duluth, Minnesota-based Aerostich mail order company to carry the turntable.

Overall, the TurnCycle Centre Stand disc is a good product. The drive-on, rail-style dollies are more expensive and they take up valuable floor space.  Also, dollies require a relatively smooth garage floor so the small castor wheels can roll.  The TurnCycle can be used if you have a rough or uneven floor.  Finally, the TurnCycle disc doesn’t take up any significant storage space.  I hang mine on the garage wall when not in use.

I like the product and think there are many motorcyclists who would find this turntable a terrific convenience to eliminate the awkward and often precarious process of backing a motorcycle from a parking space.

What I like

  • Readily available by mail order
  • Easy to use
  • Compact and hangs on wall for storage
  • Good alternative to castor wheel dolliess if your garage floor is rough or uneven

What I’m not keen on

  • Requires more technique (slightly more strength and momentum) to lift the bike on its centre stand onto the disc
  • A little pricey when shipping is factored in
  • You cannot ride onto nor off the TurnCycle disc

 

1 Comment

  1. DJ says:

    Please forward the site that I can order 1 of the 20′ Turncycle. I have a 2014 Suzuki Vstrom DL1000. The one that I have now is going bad. Thank you.
    DJ

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