Motorcycle touring Italy’s scenic Tuscany region

Ready to tour Italy's Tuscany region. A motorcycle touring holiday ready to go

Ready to tour Italy’s Tuscany region. A motorcycle touring holiday ready to go

Our motorcycle tour of Italy’s scenic Tuscany region started in Florence, Italy.

Here, Adriatic Moto Tours’ fleet of pristine motorcycles, which the tour’s riders rented.

Our rental bikes were mostly BMWs, a K1600GT, 3 latest generation liquid-cooled R1200RTs, 4 F700GSes, and 1 Suzuki DL650 V-Strom.

Our guide Tomaz rode a new R1200GS Adventure.

Our rental bikes were in pristine condition, and they all appeared to have been fitted with new tires.  And all seemed to be low mileage bikes.  My F700GS had only 9800 kilometres on it.  The one exception was the ‘veteran’ 650 V-Strom which was a few years old and had much higher mileage, the specific number I don’t recall.

Every bike was fitted with a Givi topcase, and some of the F700GSes had aftermarket Givi windscreens.

All the bikes ran flawlessly during our 9-day trip, with the exception of the V-Strom.  On Day 1 leaving our hotel in Florence, the bike wouldn’t start.  Our guides boosted it, and it seems the bike had been left with the parking light left on (a feature common on European market motorcycles.)

My Slovenian-registered F700GS's licence plate. All European Union licence plates look the same, except the country designation (top left) specifies the country and symbol (top right) differs for each country

My Slovenian-registered F700GS’s licence plate. All European Union licence plates look the same, except the country designation (top left) specifies the country and symbol (top right) differs for each country

Our tour company, Adriatic Moto Tours, is based in Slovenia, so all the bikes are registered in that country.

The “SLO” label on the top left of our licence plates showed Italian drivers we were tourists, and I think seeing that, they forgave many of the sometimes erratic riding behaviour we displayed.

In Florence, for example, during rush hour, we sometimes blocked merging traffic so our ‘convoy’ of riders could stay together, ensuring nobody would get separated from the group and lost in the unfamiliar city.

Our ‘foreign’ licence plates also helped us in the countryside one Sunday when all the local sportbike riders suited up in one-piece leathers and race mufflers were testing their roadracing skills in small, marauding packs.

Our tour group kept to the right side of these back roads and let the Rossi wannabes blitz past us at very, very high speeds.  Our exemplary road etiquette earned us a a right foot wave of thanks when these super fast riders passed us.

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