Amber lens covers for Clearwater Darla LED auxiliary lights

Can you see me now? Amber light covers fitted to Clearwater Darla LED lights

‘After.’  Can you see me now? Amber light covers fitted to Clearwater Darla LED lights at 50-percent power for daytime use.  (Canon EOS 5D MkII, 50 mm, f5.0, 1/125 sec)

I’m a big fan of increased conspicuity for motorcyclists.  The more visible I am (and think I am), the safer I feel while riding on the road.

It’s no accident that hi-viz colours like bright yellow and lime green have become more popular in recent years by many motorcycle riders.  There’s a reason why these vibrant colours have become more popular among the safety conscious among us; bright yellow and lime green are apparently more visible to the human eye than even red.  Witness the move some years ago for fire departments to switch the colour of fire fire engines from red to yellow or lime green.

Some time ago at a BMW MOA national rally, I had Clearwater Darla LED auxiliary lights mounted on the forks of the RT.  I was very pleased with their performance.  Riding at the BACK of a pack of 6 or 8 riders, the lead rider said he could always see my RT’s bright, white lights at the end of the group, thereby assuring him our group was intact and nobody had been left behind.

Lately, there’s been a trend to to further increase the visibility of the light ‘triangle’ (for those motorcycles equipped with two running lights) by adopting amber for the running lights.  The thinking is that amber is seen as ‘different’ than the ‘normal’ white daytime running lights, and therefore attracts the attention of the viewer.  Even though the ‘evidence’ is anecdotal (according to numerous claims on various motorcycle forums) that amber DRLs are more visible than white , I’d agree with postulation.

One amber, one white Clearwater Darla LED running light. Is the 'oddity' of seeing the visually asymmetrical colour light pattern enough to attract the viewer's attention?

One amber, one white Clearwater Darla LED running light at 50-percent power for daytime use. Is the ‘oddity’ of seeing the visually asymmetrical colour light pattern enough to attract the viewer’s attention?  Some believe so.  (Canon 5D MkII, f5.0, 1/250 sec)

Some of my riding friends are of the belief that running ONE amber lens and one white light for their daytime running lights (DRLs) attracts even more attention.  They argue the asymmetrical colour pattern in addition to the light triangle makes one even more visible.  Does it?  I’m not sure.

The obsessive-compulsive part of my personality screams, “Give me symmetry, or give me death!”

So I’ll stick with the dual amber lights.

'Before.' Clearwater Darla LED fork-mounted running lights (at 50-percent power for daytime use) in original white specification. (Canon 5D MkII, f5.0, 1/250 sec)

‘Before.’ Clearwater Darla LED fork-mounted running lights (at 50-percent power for daytime use) in original white specification. (Canon 5D MkII, f5.0, 1/250 sec)

My friend and fellow BMW R1200RTW rider Robyn attended the BMW MOA national rally in Salt Lake City in July and had Clearwater install a pair of Darla LED lights on his bike.  (This is his second set; he had his last gen RT similarly equipped.)

Robyn graciously picked up a pair of Clearwater amber covers for the Darla lights for me.  They have a rubber (silicone?) pliable housing and slip over the Darlas and are held on by friction.  The pair amber light covers cost about $C35.

 

 

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